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Explore the Region

The 12-county Greater Houston area is one of the largest and most diverse business regions in the nation. In our role as the Houston Economic Development Council, the Partnership is proud to represent all twelve counties that comprise the Houston region. Houston's strategic, central location coupled with the infrastructure of four of the country's largest ports, two international airports and major highway and rail service make this a dynamic hub for a large cross-section of industries. The various counties also bring their own characteristics and incentives that attract sectors from advanced manufacturing to biotech. Explore what makes each area of our region unique. 

The 12 Counties of the Greater Houston Region

Austin County
Brazoria County
Chambers County
Fort Bend County
Galveston County
Harris County
Liberty County
Montgomery County
San Jacinto County
Walker County
Waller County
Wharton County

County Spotlight: Harris

Harris County is the largest of the 12 counties in the Greater Houston region. Almost three-quarters of the county are covered by the city of Houston and thirty smaller communities; only about 27 percent of the county is rural. The county comprises 1,778 square miles and is the largest Texas county east of the Nueces River. Harris County transportation systems serve intrastate and interstate needs with six major railroads hauling freight to distribution centers and to the port; Amtrak provides passenger rail service while METRO provides light rail and passenger bus service. Buses, trucks and passenger cars utilize a network of highways including Interstate 10 east and west and Interstate 45 north and south. U.S. Highway 59 crosses the county from northeast to southwest and goes to the Rio Grande valley, and U.S. 290 leads to West Texas via Austin. Loop 610 encircles the heart of Houston, and a second loop, Beltway 8, allows traffic to move around the perimeter of the urban sector. Two major airports, George Bush Intercontinental and William P. Hobby, are within the city of Houston. Leading sectors include health care, trade, service and education. 

4,738,253

Population

104,302

Businesses

2,088,449

2020 Employment

$60,002

Per capita income

33.5

Median age

Harris County Industries & Notable Employers
Harris County Cities
Harris County Economic Development Organizations
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Explore Submarkets in Harris County

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The Clear Lake/Bay Area's two traditional industry clusters, aerospace and specialty chemical have been joined in recent years by growing health care, maritime and tourism sectors. Health care has been buoyed by the population growth in the area and the arrival of new facilities to provide for residents. Maritime growth in the area abutting Galveston Bay is largely attributable to the dominance of the region's port infrastructure. The waterfront along with popular recreation centers like the Kemah Boardwalk and of course Space Center Houston have propelled growth on the tourism/hospitality front. 

The area located about 20 miles southeast of Downtown also boasts the nation’s third largest concentration of recreational boating centers as well as an array of amateur sports, outdoor activities, beaches and parks.

Workforce within 5 miles: 79,700
Median area home value: $234,900
Median household income: $73,900


Just 30 miles northwest of Downtown along US 290, Cypress area offers a pro-business culture with a diversified work force and a variety of educational institutions. A historically rural community, the Cypress of today has become one of the most sought-after suburban residential areas in the region thanks to abundant and relatively affordable housing.  

Major industries in the area include manufacturing, construction, oil and gas, education and health care.

Workforce within 5 miles: 436,700
Median area home value: $264,000
Median household income: $80,700


With its soaring skyscrapers, dynamic entertainment scene and growing residential population, Downtown Houston has become one of the most active central business districts in the nation.

More than 50 million square feet of office space is concentrated in dozens of buildings across Downtown. Approximately 3,500 businesses operate within the district including the headquarters of ten Fortune 500 companies, among the highest concentrations in the state of Texas. Those businesses employ more than 150,000 workers. Beyond business, Downtown's ongoing revitalization includes more restaurant, nightlife and entertainment options as well as urban parks, four professional sports stadiums and thousands of new residential units that are helping create a more energized district. 

Workforce within five miles: 764,700
Median area household income: $61,300


The Energy Corridor is a roughly seven-mile long district running on both sides of I-10 between Beltway 8 and the Grand Parkway. It's located immediately north of the Westchase business district. A multitude of energy companies, energy services firms and businesses in other sectors have offices in the Corridor and its more than 26 million square feet of office space.

Workforce within 5 miles: 272,200
Median area home value: $310,000
Median household income: $74,600


Tech companies, startups and other companies will enjoy the synergy of Houston's emerging Innovation Corridor in Midtown. 

The Innovation Corridor is at the center of an extraordinarily powerful social and economic convergence. The four-mile-long Corridor is linked by light-rail, bike lanes, and sidewalks and offers easy access to key industry and institutional players along with an unparalleled array of amenities.

At the center of the Corridor is the Innovation District, clustered around a historic art deco building at the southern end of Midtown that is now The Ion. Rice University is developing the 9.4-acre Innovation District that will bring the area's entrepreneurial, corporate and academic communities together. A number of groups including the nonprofit Houston Exponential will take up residence in the development once it's complete.

Stretching from Downtown south through the Medical Center, the four-mile-long Innovation Corridor offers easy access to key industry and institutional players and an unparalleled array of amenities.

Workforce within 5 miles: 240,300
Median area home value: $406,000
Median household income: $78,100


Kingwood and the Lake Houston area offer an ideal location for businesses looking for a corporate headquarters or a major logistics hub. 

Located roughly 30 miles north of Downtown and just northeast of Bush Intercontinental Airport, the Lake Houston community and the surrounding area offers a rich environment for residents seeking a great value with high quality schools, trails, parks and lake amenities. It's also a great logistics hub for companies looking to be in close proximity to the airport and Port Houston.

Workforce within 5 miles: 86,500
Median area home value: $245,000
Median household income: $90,200


The Texas Medical Center employs over 106,000 people, hosts 10 million patient encounters annually, and has a gross domestic product of $25 billion.

The Texas Medical Center (TMC) is a 2.1-square-mile medical district and neighborhood in south-central Houston, Texas. By square footage it’s the eight largest business district in the nation. Over sixty medical institutions, largely concentrated in a triangular area between Brays Bayou, Rice University, and Hermann Park, are members of the Texas Medical Center Corporation—a non-profit umbrella organization—which constitutes the largest medical complex in the world.

TMC has an extremely high density of clinical facilities for patient care, basic science, and translational research. TMC is serviced by the METRORail Red Line which connects the district to Downtown Houston and NRG Park along the city's Innovation Corridor. 

Workforce within 5 miles: 254,300
Median household income: $81,900


The 50-mile Houston Ship Channel serves as one of the region's top trade gateways to the world. 

Stretching 50 miles from the Gulf of Mexico to the heart of city, the Houston Ship Channel is the largest trade hub for the metropolitan region. Originally built in 1914 along the pathway of Buffalo Bayou, the Channel has been widened and deepened over the decades. Today the channel is the conduit for ocean-going vessels between Houston and the rest of the world. Dozens of companies, from agriculture traders to petrochemical manufacturers, have operations along the Ship Channel allowing them to move goods and services to and from the metro region.

Workforce within five miles:160,900
Median area home value: $145,000
Median household income: $47,700


Numerous office and residential towers coupled with abundant retail and restaurant options make Uptown one of the most sought-after areas of the city.

Once known affectionately as the Galleria area thanks to the eponymous mall, Uptown Houston today is a dense business and retail district just six miles to the west of Downtown. Centered along Post Oak Boulevard and Westheimer Road, the district's abundant skyscrapers and bustling action make it a prestigious address for many companies that call Houston home. Uptown covers roughly 1,000 acres and is among the top 20 business and shopping districts in the nation. 

Workforce within 5 miles: 319,100
Median area home value: $265,000
Median household income: $94,200


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The Clear Lake/Bay Area's two traditional industry clusters, aerospace and specialty chemical have been joined in recent years by growing health care, maritime and tourism sectors. Health care has been buoyed by the population growth in the area and the arrival of new facilities to provide for residents. Maritime growth in the area abutting Galveston Bay is largely attributable to the dominance of the region's port infrastructure. The waterfront along with popular recreation centers like the Kemah Boardwalk and of course Space Center Houston have propelled growth on the tourism/hospitality front. 

The area located about 20 miles southeast of Downtown also boasts the nation’s third largest concentration of recreational boating centers as well as an array of amateur sports, outdoor activities, beaches and parks.

Workforce within 5 miles: 79,700
Median area home value: $234,900
Median household income: $73,900


Just 30 miles northwest of Downtown along US 290, Cypress area offers a pro-business culture with a diversified work force and a variety of educational institutions. A historically rural community, the Cypress of today has become one of the most sought-after suburban residential areas in the region thanks to abundant and relatively affordable housing.  

Major industries in the area include manufacturing, construction, oil and gas, education and health care.

Workforce within 5 miles: 436,700
Median area home value: $264,000
Median household income: $80,700


With its soaring skyscrapers, dynamic entertainment scene and growing residential population, Downtown Houston has become one of the most active central business districts in the nation.

More than 50 million square feet of office space is concentrated in dozens of buildings across Downtown. Approximately 3,500 businesses operate within the district including the headquarters of ten Fortune 500 companies, among the highest concentrations in the state of Texas. Those businesses employ more than 150,000 workers. Beyond business, Downtown's ongoing revitalization includes more restaurant, nightlife and entertainment options as well as urban parks, four professional sports stadiums and thousands of new residential units that are helping create a more energized district. 

Workforce within five miles: 764,700
Median area household income: $61,300


The Energy Corridor is a roughly seven-mile long district running on both sides of I-10 between Beltway 8 and the Grand Parkway. It's located immediately north of the Westchase business district. A multitude of energy companies, energy services firms and businesses in other sectors have offices in the Corridor and its more than 26 million square feet of office space.

Workforce within 5 miles: 272,200
Median area home value: $310,000
Median household income: $74,600


Tech companies, startups and other companies will enjoy the synergy of Houston's emerging Innovation Corridor in Midtown. 

The Innovation Corridor is at the center of an extraordinarily powerful social and economic convergence. The four-mile-long Corridor is linked by light-rail, bike lanes, and sidewalks and offers easy access to key industry and institutional players along with an unparalleled array of amenities.

At the center of the Corridor is the Innovation District, clustered around a historic art deco building at the southern end of Midtown that is now The Ion. Rice University is developing the 9.4-acre Innovation District that will bring the area's entrepreneurial, corporate and academic communities together. A number of groups including the nonprofit Houston Exponential will take up residence in the development once it's complete.

Stretching from Downtown south through the Medical Center, the four-mile-long Innovation Corridor offers easy access to key industry and institutional players and an unparalleled array of amenities.

Workforce within 5 miles: 240,300
Median area home value: $406,000
Median household income: $78,100


Kingwood and the Lake Houston area offer an ideal location for businesses looking for a corporate headquarters or a major logistics hub. 

Located roughly 30 miles north of Downtown and just northeast of Bush Intercontinental Airport, the Lake Houston community and the surrounding area offers a rich environment for residents seeking a great value with high quality schools, trails, parks and lake amenities. It's also a great logistics hub for companies looking to be in close proximity to the airport and Port Houston.

Workforce within 5 miles: 86,500
Median area home value: $245,000
Median household income: $90,200


The Texas Medical Center employs over 106,000 people, hosts 10 million patient encounters annually, and has a gross domestic product of $25 billion.

The Texas Medical Center (TMC) is a 2.1-square-mile medical district and neighborhood in south-central Houston, Texas. By square footage it’s the eight largest business district in the nation. Over sixty medical institutions, largely concentrated in a triangular area between Brays Bayou, Rice University, and Hermann Park, are members of the Texas Medical Center Corporation—a non-profit umbrella organization—which constitutes the largest medical complex in the world.

TMC has an extremely high density of clinical facilities for patient care, basic science, and translational research. TMC is serviced by the METRORail Red Line which connects the district to Downtown Houston and NRG Park along the city's Innovation Corridor. 

Workforce within 5 miles: 254,300
Median household income: $81,900


The 50-mile Houston Ship Channel serves as one of the region's top trade gateways to the world. 

Stretching 50 miles from the Gulf of Mexico to the heart of city, the Houston Ship Channel is the largest trade hub for the metropolitan region. Originally built in 1914 along the pathway of Buffalo Bayou, the Channel has been widened and deepened over the decades. Today the channel is the conduit for ocean-going vessels between Houston and the rest of the world. Dozens of companies, from agriculture traders to petrochemical manufacturers, have operations along the Ship Channel allowing them to move goods and services to and from the metro region.

Workforce within five miles:160,900
Median area home value: $145,000
Median household income: $47,700


Numerous office and residential towers coupled with abundant retail and restaurant options make Uptown one of the most sought-after areas of the city.

Once known affectionately as the Galleria area thanks to the eponymous mall, Uptown Houston today is a dense business and retail district just six miles to the west of Downtown. Centered along Post Oak Boulevard and Westheimer Road, the district's abundant skyscrapers and bustling action make it a prestigious address for many companies that call Houston home. Uptown covers roughly 1,000 acres and is among the top 20 business and shopping districts in the nation. 

Workforce within 5 miles: 319,100
Median area home value: $265,000
Median household income: $94,200


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Top 8 Spring Festivals in Houston

4/12/23
Houston comes alive in the spring with an array of exciting festivals that showcase the best of performing and visual arts, music, food, and more. From traditional celebrations to contemporary events, we've curated a list of must-attend spring festivals happening in the Houston area, so you can make the most of the season and immerse yourself in the region's unique cultural offerings.  The Woodlands Waterway Arts Festival Click to expand Experience a colorful outdoor art gallery April 14-16 featuring national and international artists with a variety of mediums including painting, clay, metal, and more. Enjoy live music, entertainment, local food, beer and wine, and children's art activities for a fun family experience.   The Houston Art Car Parade Click to expand Roll around on April 15 for the Houston Art Car Parade, which attracts over 250 cars and an audience of 300,000 spectators eager to see the weird and wild roadway creations.    Puranava Indian Art & Culture Fest  Click to expand Celebrate Indian culture on April 15 featuring stage performances of Indian classical and folk dances, music, visual art & cultural exhibits and more.    Houston Latin Fest Click to expand Celebrate Latin heritage with a family-oriented music festival that provides communities Houston a gathering place to connect with others. Immerse yourself in the Latin experience on April 23 with Latin music, cuisine, art and more.    Frida Festival Click to expand With over 30,000 attendees, the Frida Festival offers a range of festivities with fashion shows, art exhibits and performances honoring the iconic Frida Kahlo. Save the date for April 19 and 29!    Japan Festival Houston Click to expand After a four-year hiatus, the Japanese Festival returns to Houston on May 6-7. Enjoy the celebration of Houston’s rich Japanese culture and the 30th anniversary of the Japanese Garden with contemporary performances, food, tea ceremonies and much more.    Houston Art Bike Festival Click to expand No car? No problem! The Houston Art Bike Parade & Festival showcases modified art bikes. Whether small changes or big transformations, you can participate on May 13.   Pasadena Strawberry Festival Click to expand Looking for country music, an epic mud volleyball tournament, an authentic Texan BBQ cook off, and the world’s largest strawberry shortcake? Book your calendars for a Texas-sized fun festival from May 18-21.  Learn more about what it’s like to live in Houston.
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Harris County Toll Road Authority's New Plan to Create Additional Trailways

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A new plan designed to increase access to green space, improve air quality and increase transportation options in Harris County is moving forward. The Harris County Commissioners Court recently approved an initial $53 million for Harris County Toll Road Authority’s “Tollways to Trailways” plan. It includes 236 miles of active transportation projects with the goal of increasing access to trailways, bikeways, parks, transit hubs, schools and communities.  According to HCTRA’s planning document, the agency has identified 22 “quick win” projects, projects with less hurdles and higher community benefits, with an estimated cost of $131 million. Projects include adding a west extension from Mercer Botanic Gardens to Lents Family Park to the Cypress Creek Greenway and a trail along Space Center Boulevard from Middlebrook Drive to the Battleground Golf Course in Deer Park.  Click to expand Map of proposed Tollways to Trailways projects (Courtesy: HCTRA) The initial funding approved will go toward design and implementation of some of the quick win projects and portions of the Houston to Galveston Trail project within Harris County limits. The Houston to Galveston Trail is focused on creating a safe connection between Emancipation Park and Mason Park. There are an additional 41 projects with an estimated cost of $470 million. The HCTRA says collaboration, partnerships and public input will be required for the plan to be successful.  The additional trailways will only add to the region’s expansive trail and bikeway system. In a Facebook post reacting to a Houston Chronicle editorial, Precinct 1 Commissioner Rodney Ellis praised the project writing, “I think the Tollways to Trailways project is a game-changer. Harris County can be a leader in delivering transformative transportation solutions for our residents.” Learn more about living in Houston and transportation infrastructure across the region.  
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Key Industries

From energy and life sciences to manufacturing and aerospace, the Houston region offers a dynamic infrastructure to support a number of thriving core industries.

Taxes & Incentives

Houston offers a highly competitive business environment at a favorable cost. State and local incentives as well as a favorable tax structure make this region an attractive place to do business for companies of all sizes.

Talent & Workforce

Houston offers a highly educated and ever-growing workforce skilled in both traditional and emerging industries.

Need more information about Houston? Your dedicated team member can help:

 
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Craig Rhodes
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Economic Development
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crhodes@315tccs.com
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713-844-3609
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